Greek-American Historical Museum of Washington State

Athens

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Stamatis Philippou Vokos has never changed his name although many non-Greeks, even his wife when she first met him, have found it difficult to …

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Yannis (John) Xydis still has the first guitar he purchased in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, in 1967. He continues to play and sing with the same emotion that inspired him while growing up in Greece.

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As his Greek dance students were poised to go on stage, John Tziotis called out “showtime” to raise their spirits for the performance. He has been affectionately known by that nickname since that time.

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As a bilingual legal secretary, Molly Conom, interpreted and translated for her boss, attorney Gust Kostakos, who spoke only English which his Greek-speaking clients did not know.

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In his youth, Panos George Takis (Tsiknes) learned to share what he had with others. He was taught the spirit of generosity on the family farm in Machias, Washington, which was a gathering place for many Greeks. Today he continues to help others in need.

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John and Penny Sakellaris’ summer home on Blue Lake in central Washington has, according to Penny, “as much electrical wiring as The White House.”

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This is the reply Elly (Helle) Protopsaltou Pangis received when she humbly said she was not qualified to teach Greek school.

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Andreanna Raptis Zafiropoulos has always wanted to write the history of Greeks in Washington State. However, when she left Everett for Quincy, she had no idea that her desire would be realized.

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That’s what Stamatios (Steve) Demetrios (James) Bratsanos said to his prospective wife before they left Greece to spend their lives together in the United States.

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Would you really want to buy insurance from a man who fell out of a second story window or had a tree fall on him while driving his convertible? Many satisfied clients have!