Greek-American Historical Museum of Washington State

First Generation

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The story that follows was written by Maria (Mary) Doxanis (Docsanes) Erickson in April of 2014 and has been reformatted and edited for this exhibit.

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Seattle, Washington’s Wallingford neighborhood was the Greek community for siblings Gus Cooper and Tasia Prineas.

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Mary George (nee Courounes) has held on tightly to her Greek heritage while living in Seattle, Washington, almost her entire life.

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As a bilingual legal secretary, Molly Conom, interpreted and translated for her boss, attorney Gust Kostakos, who spoke only English which his Greek-speaking clients did not know.

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West Seattle was home for a large number of Greek families when Thalia and Kiki Denos were growing up. Their family home was a center of activity for many friends and relatives.

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With both Belgian and Greek legacies, Pearl Pavlos chose the latter and has always seen herself “as Greek as I can get” with inseparable ties to her Greek Orthodox Church.

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In his youth, Panos George Takis (Tsiknes) learned to share what he had with others. He was taught the spirit of generosity on the family farm in Machias, Washington, which was a gathering place for many Greeks. Today he continues to help others in need.

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For sister and brother, Voula Dodd and John John, life in Tacoma included much of the culture and traditions of living on the island of Marmara.

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Pauli (Pauline) Cave’s name is interesting. Her given name, Polixeni, literally translated means many strangers and her first married name, Diafos, was originally Diafilakis or two little kisses.

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Bill and Jeanne Kaimakis have shared many wonderful and challenging moments both in houses on land and on a 50-foot ocean-going vessel.