Greek-American Historical Museum of Washington State

Nationality

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Agriculturist, businessman, author, cook and community leader all describe this man who began his life in Everett’s tough Riverside district and rose to prominence.

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From 1972 to 1984 the Greek Radio Hour, with disco cavalaris (disc jockey) Spyridon “Spiro” Demetrios Savvides, served to entertain and inform with music and news from the homeland. This was only one of the many endeavors Spiro developed in his varied career.

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Spiro “Spedo” Southas spent a lot of time as a cop in Bellingham, Washington, but he probably spent as much time visiting fellow Greeks throughout the state.

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With over 80 years of sewing experience Clara Nicon (nee Chakos) was asked why she never considered selling her work. Her reply? “Never, never. I think of it as sharing my talents.”

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For Angelina (nee Mulenos) Larson, it was her voice and musical talent that brought a zest for life that remains to this day.

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Two signs hang on Jerry Costacos’ office door. On his 40th birthday, one of his employees put a sign saying “THE GOLDEN GREEK – O CRISO ELLHN.” Another sign saying “GO GREEK GO” had been placed there by a good friend.

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Cashmere, with its apple orchards and factories was a change from the coffee shops and small churches that had been typical in Anna’s Greek village of Vitalo. Although she spoke no English it was not difficult for her to adjust to life in Cashmere, Washington.

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Four children, 13 men named George, a happy family life and unselfish dedication to their church and community.

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In the 1900s many Greeks found financial success in the food and beverage businesses. Spiro “Spin” Nicon’s entrepreneurial skills, honesty and friendly personality made him one of those Greeks in Seattle.

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How better to keep community than through music and food. Demetrios “Takis” Dotis, one of the true masters of the bouzouki and experienced restaurateur, does both.