Greek-American Historical Museum of Washington State

Everett

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As Tommy Rakus’ family came from Roumeli, tin carthia tis Elathas (the heart of Greece), his passion for all things Greek originates not from the food, the dancing or the language but from his heart.

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It was the close community of Greeks that gave Harry and Billie Platis their happiness and feeling of security while growing up in Everett, Washington.

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Mihail Papadimitriou continues to operate People’s Shoe Repair in Everett, Washington, which his uncle originally began in 1934. The quality of his craft and the loyalty of his customers make his story unique in Washington State.

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When Demetrios (James, Jim or “Jimmy”) Michael Markezinis was presented with opportunities for work in his new country, despite their unpredictability, he pondered for a moment and then said “OK.”

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In his youth, Panos George Takis (Tsiknes) learned to share what he had with others. He was taught the spirit of generosity on the family farm in Machias, Washington, which was a gathering place for many Greeks. Today he continues to help others in need.

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Andreanna Raptis Zafiropoulos has always wanted to write the history of Greeks in Washington State. However, when she left Everett for Quincy, she had no idea that her desire would be realized.

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Thomay (from Thomas) “May” Fenerly grew up in a small cottage on Sequim Bay on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula without a road until 1937 and without electricity until 1955.

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Agriculturist, businessman, author, cook and community leader all describe this man who began his life in Everett’s tough Riverside district and rose to prominence.

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Spiro “Spedo” Southas spent a lot of time as a cop in Bellingham, Washington, but he probably spent as much time visiting fellow Greeks throughout the state.

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It was the 50s. They called her Faye and she called her Theo Panagioti Nicolaou Papageorgiou “Uncle Pete.”