Greek-American Historical Museum of Washington State

Seattle

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The framed pieces on the wall appear to be photos. However, when one looks closely, the cross stitch and needle point pieces show how meticulously the work has been done.

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From 1972 to 1984 the Greek Radio Hour, with disco cavalaris (disc jockey) Spyridon “Spiro” Demetrios Savvides, served to entertain and inform with music and news from the homeland. This was only one of the many endeavors Spiro developed in his varied career.

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Once while preparing one of her buttery-rich meals, Andromachi Neckas (nee Petropoulou) started an oven fire. The firemen who quickly extinguished the flames were then treated to a sample of her excellent Greek cuisine.

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With over 80 years of sewing experience Clara Nicon (nee Chakos) was asked why she never considered selling her work. Her reply? “Never, never. I think of it as sharing my talents.”

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For Angelina (nee Mulenos) Larson, it was her voice and musical talent that brought a zest for life that remains to this day.

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Why does this man spell his name with two “t”s and what were the keys to his happiness as a Greek in the city of Seattle?

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In 1954 Sonny Newman was walking by Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church in Spokane when he heard music coming from the basement. Knowing a bit about Greek dancing, of course he went in. This experience expanded his career to include performing and teaching Greek dance.

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In April of 2011 while sorting through a box of memorabilia a well-remembered document about Greek music surfaced. A found treasure: “Musical Memories of Nine Seattle Greeks.”

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For those who know a few Greek dance steps and those having grown up with the usual syrto, tsamiko, hassapiko dances at weddings and other celebrations, it becomes routine. For Yvonne Hunt, dancing is a way of expressing the deeper meaning of the culture.

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Four children, 13 men named George, a happy family life and unselfish dedication to their church and community.