Greek-American Historical Museum of Washington State

Tacoma

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My mom, Naouma Filou, was later to became Naouma Godulas. Her story begins in 1918 in the small village of Siatista in the foothills of northern Greece. She said that she was uncertain of the day she was born, so she had just picked a date – Sept. 15th.

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For sister and brother, Voula Dodd and John John, life in Tacoma included much of the culture and traditions of living on the island of Marmara.

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As a youngster in Tacoma, Washington, JoAnn Tryfon’s Greek school lessons did not stay with her. However, in her retirement years she has come to understand and appreciate what she missed as a child.

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Steve Mallos is not one to brag about his life. Growing up in a rather poor family, he retired as a Vice President of the American Automobile Association (AAA) of Washington despite several injuries and serious illnesses along the way.

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While Fr. Kouklis conducted baptism or funeral services in the church, his son was in court for an adoption or a will probate.

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This is the reply Elly (Helle) Protopsaltou Pangis received when she humbly said she was not qualified to teach Greek school.

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The story of Alexander Pantages is one of an epic struggle of poverty-to-riches against the backdrop of business treachery, anti-immigrant sentiment and butting of titanic egos involving Joseph P. Kennedy and press baron, William Randolph Hearst.

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The butterfly collection in Ethel Barbas’ home personifies her joyful and optimistic visits with family and friends as she travels the roads in western Washington. Testimony to her travel is her 1997 Honda del Sol with over 350,000 miles.

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The Museum has been fortunate to receive an article written by Michail Diamianos Katramados in Thessaloniki, Greece, and translated by his daughter Fotoula Katramdou. It pays tribute to Michail’s uncle, Theodosios Katramadou, who immigrated to Tacoma, Washington, during the early 20th century and subsequently became a benefactor for his family in Greece. It is a poignant snapshot of the life and works of an “anonymous” Greek American who touched many lives in the old country, without ever seeing them or expecting anything in return.

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George, Andrew, and Angelo Ballasiotes’ youthful escapades were occasionally overlooked as their father Christos was well known and respected in Aberdeen, Washington.