Greek-American Historical Museum of Washington State

Immigrant

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The story of Alexander Pantages is one of an epic struggle of poverty-to-riches against the backdrop of business treachery, anti-immigrant sentiment and butting of titanic egos involving Joseph P. Kennedy and press baron, William Randolph Hearst.

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The Museum has been fortunate to receive an article written by Michail Diamianos Katramados in Thessaloniki, Greece, and translated by his daughter Fotoula Katramdou. It pays tribute to Michail’s uncle, Theodosios Katramadou, who immigrated to Tacoma, Washington, during the early 20th century and subsequently became a benefactor for his family in Greece. It is a poignant snapshot of the life and works of an “anonymous” Greek American who touched many lives in the old country, without ever seeing them or expecting anything in return.

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George Seraphim Serpanos may not share the ingredients for his salad dressing but his recipe for success in Seattle’s restaurant business is no secret. He has owned seven restaurants, operated or worked in seven others and has relatives operating three more.

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As the only Greeks in Walla Walla, Washington, Georgia George Sakas (nee Roumeliotis) and her husband Frank made a significant impact through their hard work and friendly manner.

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John (Ioannis) Theodoros Gormanos has written extensively about his life beginning with his childhood in northern Macedonia through his long journey to Spokane, Washington.

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That’s what Stamatios (Steve) Demetrios (James) Bratsanos said to his prospective wife before they left Greece to spend their lives together in the United States.

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For Terry (Sotiros) Nikolaos Karis (Kanakaris) making good parea (companionship) has been the key to a successful life in Seattle’s Greek community.

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At fifteen years of age, Ted (Theodore) Kaltsounis, his parents and five siblings escaped from Albania over the mountains into Greece to avoid communism and execution of his father.

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One would only have to receive a few of the cleaned fresh vegetables and fruits from her garden to appreciate how Triantafilia (Rose) Hanches (nee Stefanis) has given generously to her family, friends and church.

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The framed pieces on the wall appear to be photos. However, when one looks closely, the cross stitch and needle point pieces show how meticulously the work has been done.